CSO Quarterly Report

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The attached spreadsheet, as of August 8, 2018, indicates asphalt playground replacement projects throughout the district. Sites are ranked in order of severity from Priority I to Priority V as indicated below:

Priority I: Address Immediate Health and Safety Risks

Priority I Projects pose an identifiable and immediate health and safety risk to either students, staff or other school site users.

Priority II: Address Existing Deficiencies to Building Envelope, Site Conditions or Systems

Priority II Projects, if not addressed within the next year, have a high probability of resulting in health and safety risks (Priority I Projects).

Priority III: Address Imminent Deficiencies to Building Envelope or Site Conditions

Priority III Projects, if not addressed within the next five years, have a high probability of resulting in damage to building envelope, site conditions, or systems (Priority II Projects). These projects typically include systems that are still operational, but have exceeded their expected operational lifecycles.

Priority IV: Address Eligible Deferred Maintenance Projects Related to the Education Program

Priority IV Projects are not hierarchical, meaning that if they are not addressed, they will not escalate to either Priority I, II or III Projects. Priority IV projects are specific to improving the delivery of the educational program.

Priority V: Address Other Eligible Deferred Maintenance Projects

Priority V Projects are not hierarchical, meaning that if they are not addressed, they will not escalate to either Priority I, II or III Projects. Priority V projects are eligible deferred maintenance projects that do not fit into any of the other priority categories.

In the attached spreadsheet, Playground Asphalt, sites are listed in Priority order. In addition, you will note the proposed year in which we would hope to have funding available for such projects. The last two pages include information about projects (in red) completed since 2013, when Measures Q and R and the State’s Emergency Repair Program began funding some of these much needed replacements.